sound

Why are certain small bodies of water called 'sounds?'

Before doing any reporting on Currituck Sound, I had to answer the most basic of questions: just what is a sound? 

It turns out there are a couple of ways to define a sound. 

One type of sound is a relatively narrow passage of water between the mainland and an island. It's also an inlet, bay or recessed portion of the ocean. Currituck Sound certainly fits those definitions. So does Pamlico Sound, as well as Puget Sound in Washington. 

Blackbeard the Wave Glider

To our ears, the sound of being underwater is all the same muffled tone. But to East Carolina University scientists, the noise carries all sorts of information about the ocean. Watch as researchers use their acoustic wave glider named Blackbeard to study underwater noise, acoustically tagged fish and environmental conditions in the ocean.

If You Give a Mouse a Cooler

Who says big plastic coolers are just for keeping beer, soft drinks and food cold for tailgating?

Certainly not Dr. Erich Jarvis, who is an associate professor of neurobiology at Duke University. Let me tell you about some real scientific ingenuity!

Dr. Jarvis’ lab in the Bryan Research Building on the Duke campus is lined with rows and rows of blue coolers with white lids. They are the same type of coolers you see all over the place if you walk through the tailgating area at a football game or sitting near picnic tables in parks.