Tue, 01/16/2018 - 6:09pm

NOAA

Asheville is an Epicenter for Climate Science

Have you ever had to sort through the drawers of a dresser, finding it a bit stressful? Is cleaning out a closet a little overwhelming? Does the thought of sorting through all of the items in your garage, or your attic give you a headache? 

Then imagine sorting through, making sense of and organizing 25 petabytes (that's the equivalent of 25 million gigabytes) of data in various forms: charts, graphs, maps and even journal entries. 

Flash Facts

It’s time for a news flash, or at least a lightning flash.

The folks at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) tell me that lightning flashes more than three million times a day around the world. That’s about 40 flashes per second. Not all of those flashes hit the ground and those flashes are pretty quick—lasting only about 30 microseconds.

If Hurricane Hazel Hit Today...

While the debate rages on about the cause of sea level rise and if human activity is speeding up the process, the phenomena itself is not a new coastal hazard. Scientists have plenty of evidence that ocean levels rise and fall several times over thousands of years. Scientists have pretty strong evidence the seas are rising again. What makes sea level change so significant now is that there are many more of us living near the coast. And, as the report by the North Carolina Coastal Resources Commission's Science Panel says, “over time it exacerbates existing coastal hazards.”

Making Waves

Ask anybody what they like about North Carolina’s beaches and you’ll likely hear responses like warm sun, warm sand, ocean breeze, and fresh seafood at the restaurants. The answers vary, of course, but I think one thing that everyone likes about the beach is the sound of the waves.

So the question is... What makes an ocean wave?

The answer is simple: wind.

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