endangered species

Multi-functional Seagrass Beds are Disappearing from the Coast

You could say the best thing about seagrass is that you don’t have to mow it. 

Okay, that may be a stretch. 

But in truth, seagrass is beneficial in its role as an important coastal habitat. That’s because young ocean-going fish can grow and develop in seagrass beds before setting out on their journey of life. 

So Go the Trees, So Go the Carolina Chickadees

I hate to sing the blues about our nation’s songbirds, but after reporting the story about the concerns for the future of the Carolina Chickadee, I think I should. 

That’s because scientists say that since the end of World War II, there has been a decline in the songbird population over much of the eastern United States. And that includes the Carolina Chickadee. 

It’s not an even decline, which makes it difficult to pinpoint the exact cause. 

Firefly Light Shows could become a Thing of the Past

Seeing fireflies appear all at once in your own backyard, as if a sparkling cloud hovering above the grass, is pretty cool—almost magical. It’s as if a Disney movie is coming to life right in front of you. 

Researchers know fireflies glow as part of the adult mating ritual. What’s not known, is how long fireflies will continue to light the night. Scientists all agree that fireflies are disappearing from forests, fields and marshes all over the country. In fact, fireflies may eventually fade forever, all over the world. 

The Oak Stands Tall

The eastern United States' mightiest tree, the oak, is in decline, possibly due to over-harvesting or climate change. Whatever the cause, scientists are trying to find ways to reverse this decline. Watch U.S. Forest Service researchers use fire to give young oaks room to grow in the North Carolina mountains.

Animals on the Grid

Animals in Africa face challenges from dwindling habitats and climate, but most dangerous of all can be farmers or poachers who can kill threatened species for protection and profit. Watch how researchers at the North Carolina Zoo are using radio and satellite tracking to follow and protect animals in Africa and in our own backyard.

Pages