Duke Lemur Center

Leaping Lemurs

Duke Lemur Center preserves and protects lemurs, unique primates that are the ancient relatives of monkeys, apes and humans. Lemurs evolved in isolation on Madagascar, but are threatened as the island's human population grows. Researchers study behavior, genomics, physiology and conservation biology in order to preserve the existence of lemurs worldwide.

Lemurs and Big Data

Duke’s Lemur Center used to be called the Duke University Primate Center. It’s been around so long the place has changed its name. The center was founded in 1966 and since then has been home to almost 4200 individuals.

As scientists are supposed to do, there have been meticulous records kept on all of those creatures. The release of all that data to the public is not only a gold mine for scientists, it also highlights a new area of science called data science.

What’s My Story: Zoologist Jenny Campbell

Dr. Jenny Campbell is the Zoology Coordinator for the Department of Biological Sciences at NC State University and a teaching professor. Growing up, she went to sleep every night with a dog on her bed and knows the comfort humans derive from their companion animals. After working with elephants, right whales, red wolves, and lemurs, she now focuses her attention on the human-animal relationship as a professor at NC State University.