Thu, 03/30/2017 - 12:28pm

NC Science Now Reporter's blog

Lake Mattamuskeet: From Formation, to World's Largest Pumping Plant

Lake Mattamuskeet is North Carolina’s largest natural lake at 40,000 acres. 

Not surprisingly, the lake is a big draw for hunters, fishermen, bird watchers and others looking for wildlife and outdoor-dependent recreation. The lake is surrounded by an additional estimated 10,000 acres of marsh, timber and cropland which together make up the Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge. 

Understanding a Solar Eclipse: Then and Now

Thanks to scientific observations with telescopes, satellites and mathematical calculations, we not only understand what happens during a solar eclipse but we can also predict when they will occur and where they will be seen well into the future. 

That hasn’t always been the case. 

Take, for example, the origin of the word eclipse. It’s derived from the ancient Greek word ekleipsis, meaning "abandonment." You get the idea. The folks back then thought the Sun had just turned off. It had, in effect, abandoned the Earth. 

Why are certain small bodies of water called 'sounds?'

Before doing any reporting on Currituck Sound, I had to answer the most basic of questions: just what is a sound? 

It turns out there are a couple of ways to define a sound. 

One type of sound is a relatively narrow passage of water between the mainland and an island. It's also an inlet, bay or recessed portion of the ocean. Currituck Sound certainly fits those definitions. So does Pamlico Sound, as well as Puget Sound in Washington. 

A Durham Organization Uncovers New Clues to the Lost Colony

Sometimes the simplest question leads to major discoveries. 

This is certainly true in the search for the Lost Colony.  

But first, a little background.   

Back in 1585, British explorer John White traveled to Roanoke Island and produced an excruciatingly accurate map of the North Carolina and Virginia coast and other drawings of the island. Two years later, White led a colony of 116 English settlers to the area. 

Pages