Tue, 01/16/2018 - 8:31pm

Blogs

Understanding a Solar Eclipse: Then and Now

Thanks to scientific observations with telescopes, satellites and mathematical calculations, we not only understand what happens during a solar eclipse but we can also predict when they will occur and where they will be seen well into the future. 

That hasn’t always been the case. 

Take, for example, the origin of the word eclipse. It’s derived from the ancient Greek word ekleipsis, meaning "abandonment." You get the idea. The folks back then thought the Sun had just turned off. It had, in effect, abandoned the Earth. 

A Deadly Day at Sea: The Fateful Battle of the Atlantic

To understand the Battle of the Atlantic, you need to go back one day before the actual armed conflict. 

On July 14, 1942, a convoy of 19 merchant ships and five military escort ships set sail from Hampton Roads, Virginia. The convoy was named KS-520, with the “KS” indicating they were moving south along the coast heading to Key West, Florida. 

New, controversial animal hybrid research may one day save lives

New, controversial animal hybrid research may one day save lives
February 8, 2017

It's not news of a flying car, a laser gun or a jetpack, but two major studies of a different subject published this week that seem to have walked off the page of a science fiction novel. Scientists have created hybrid animals: one animal containing cells and organs from another.

Why are certain small bodies of water called 'sounds?'

Before doing any reporting on Currituck Sound, I had to answer the most basic of questions: just what is a sound? 

It turns out there are a couple of ways to define a sound. 

One type of sound is a relatively narrow passage of water between the mainland and an island. It's also an inlet, bay or recessed portion of the ocean. Currituck Sound certainly fits those definitions. So does Pamlico Sound, as well as Puget Sound in Washington. 

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