Articles

Where the Wild Things Are

Camera traps provide pretty basic information. Biologists use the images to confirm what animals live in a given area. There is photographic proof, along with the date/time stamp, that an animal was in a specific place, at a specific time and on a specific date.

And while any photograph is cool, if it happens to be of an animal that is endangered or difficult to spot, the picture becomes even more valuable.

But while the research is new, the irony is that the use of camera traps really isn’t.

Fish Tagging

Ecosystems have limits to the numbers of organisms and population sizes they can support. These limits are set by predation, competition, diseases and the physical habitat (reefs, artificial reefs, mud flats, sea grass, and marsh). Fish biologists are using two types of tagging to understand how the physical environment constrains the population dynamics of the red drum, North Carolina's state fish.

What's My Story: Biosystem Engineering

It was obvious to anyone that John Sheppard wanted to be an engineer when he built himself an original Mini Cooper at age 15 from junkyard pieces. But he loved biology too—the ways biological systems work together. Add those proclivities to a long and successful career and you end up with a professor of brewing at North Carolina State University.

Bioprocess Engineering: a conglomerate of mathematics, biology and industrial design, and includes the design and study of fermentors.

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